President Paul Kagame

President Paul Kagame, 2008

The news these days from Africa isn’t all bad. In fact, in some places, it’s downright hopeful, as Rwandan President Paul Kagame (b. 1957) attests. “Our continent is no longer all about violence and disease and human disasters that scarred many African countries in recent decades,” says Kagame. “We are now becoming a continent of opportunities.” There are those who doubted Rwanda could “constitute a viable state,” says Kagame, but 14 years after bloody genocide and civil war, his country has managed an astonishing revival.

President Oscar Arias Sánchez

President Oscar Arias Sánchez, 1997

After studying in the United States, Oscar Arias Sánchez (b. 1940) studied law and economics at the University of Costa Rica and engaged actively in the work of the National Liberation Party. Having completed his degree, he went on to finish his doctorate in England, with a thesis on the subject of “Who Rules Costa Rica?”

Robert M. Solow

Robert M. Solow, 1975

Robert M. Solow (b. 1924) is considered to be one of the founders of modern neoclassical economics. He utilized determinants of economic growth to be separated out into increases in inputs and technical progress. Using his model, he calculated that about four-fifths of the growth in U.S. output per worker was attributable to technical progress. Solow also was the first to develop a growth model with different vintages of capital.

Paul A. Samuelson

Paul A. Samuelson, 1969

Paul Anthony Samuelson (1915 - 2009) was an American neo-Keynesian economist known for his contributions to many fields of economics, beginning with his general statement of the comparative statics method in his 1947 book Foundations of Economic Analysis. Samuelson was awarded the John Bates Clark Medal in 1947 and was sole recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1970, the second year of the Prize.